Category Archives: Events

MAKE LEWES FESTIVAL 2018

This September sees the return of Make Lewes Festival with another series of inspiring and informative workshops, talks and Symposia exploring the relationship between making, architecture, design and sustainability.

21st – 30th September 2018

Highlights include:

Friday, September 21

Collaborative Conspiracies

18.30 -21.30 at Fitzroy House, Cliffe Precinct, Lewes BN7 2AD
Talks by Fred Baier and William Hardie, two leading woody designers, and sit-down supper.

Talks, vegetarian mezze, cake and a complimentary drink: £22.50.
Places limited. Book via eventbrite.co.uk.


Friday, September 21 to Sunday, September 23

Collaborative Collisions III

10.00 – 17.00 at Depot Cinema, Pinwell Rd, Lewes BN7 2JS
Improvisations with Lewes makers and crafts-people.

Free.


Friday, 28 September

Makers Talks Evening

19.30 at Studio Hardie, Unit 1, Lewes, BN7 2PE
With Jim Keeling, Oxford Anagama Project, Barbara Keal, Felt Maker and Elaine Bolt, Ceramicist.

Free (donations welcome)


Saturday, September 29 

Pop-up Pottery & Kiln firing workshop

10.00 – 17.00 at Linklater Pavilion, Railway Land, Lewes, BN7 2FG
Family workshop with Martin Brockman making pots from local materials fired in a wheelbarrow with locally sourced wood.

Free (donations welcome)

Building with Water

13.30 – 18.00 at Fitzroy House, Cliffe Precinct, Lewes, BN7 2AD
Water, Building, Architecture, Material Sources and the Future – talks by international and national speakers

Talks and water tasting: £8.50 Concessions £6.50. Book via eventbrite.co.uk.


Sunday, September 30

FutureScoping

13.30 – 17.30 at Depot Cinema, Pinwell Rd, Lewes BN7 2JS
The future of Lewes’s cultural infrastructure provision: What do we want? What does Lewes need?

Tickets £6.50 Concessions £4.50. (available through Depot website here)

Further events to be anounced…

Any questions? Email: info@makinglewes.org


Image credit: S AM Swiss Architecture Museum, “Bengal Stream³ 2017/18, photo: Iwan Baan

 

MLF 2018 – Collaborative Conspiracies

MAKE LEWES FESTIVAL 2018 LAUNCH EVENT

Tongue and Groove and Algorithms – the Fred and Will Story

Sit-down vegetarian supper with special guest talks by designer makers Fred Baier and William Hardie.

Friday September 21st 18.30 prompt at Fitzroy House, Lewes BN7 2AD map

Tickets £22.50 (includes vegetarian mezze supper, cake and a complimentary drink) Pay bar available. Booking online through eventbrite.

Fred Baier is an internationally renowned furniture maker, who pioneered the use of computer aided design in furniture making in the 1980’s, and has been at the forefront of drawing together analogue and digital making in the decades since.

William Hardie, is well known in Lewes for Studio Hardie. Resolving seemingly impossible design challenges, William has become a familiar face on Amazing Space’s and other TV programmes. Less known is that years ago Fred and William worked together on a public art project leading to a long and creative friendship.

The pair will thread together their shared story during the course of the evening.

Collaborative Conspiracies is part of Make Lewes Festival 2018

Kinship IV Workshop (Postponed*)

Kinship IV Design & Make Workshop POSTPONED*

* For unexpected reasons Kinship IV has been postponed untill spring 2019. Details to be confirmed in October. If you wish to be involved and kept up to date please email us at info@makinglewes.org

Make Lewes Festival’s fourth Kinship workshop co-led by William Hardie of Studio Hardie and Sally Daniels of tangentfield with a site tour and introduction to the ‘Heart of Reeds’ from artist Chris Drury.

26th – 28th September, 10.00 – 18.00

Venue – Linklater Pavilion, Railway Land and Studio Hardie Workshop map

Tickets £95, Students £75

definition: kinship – a close connection marked by community of interests or similarity in nature or character

– a sharing of characteristics or origins – relationships between family members – a feeling of being close or similar…

BRIEF

With our fantastic team of designers and makers, we will collaboratively dream-up, draw-up, build, install and test-out a remarkable nest of 4 outdoor benches to be enjoyed as kinship by all. As for every Kinship; we aim for beauty, comfort, conviviality and for Kinship IV we will need steadfast durability!

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SITE

The Railway land. This will not only be the home of our design endeavours but the prototyping, sharing, testing and production area itself.

PROCESS

Participants gather on site 25th September. There we will first discover the components of our workshop, space to construct and pitch together.

Once we have a shelter in place, and materials gathered, we will begin to dream and scheme in teams through the game of ‘consequences’ or ‘exquisite corps’*1. This will give our work a special twist and some surprise ingredients! And best of all, passers-by will this year be invited to join in and join up our benches!

 

1* Exquisite corpse, also known as exquisite cadaver is a method by which a collection of words or images is collectively assembled. … The technique was invented by surrealists and is similar to an old parlour game …Consequences is an old parlour game in a similar vein to the Surrealist game exquisite corpse and Mad Libs. Each person takes a turn writing a word or phrase forming part of a set structure in order to build a story.

 

If you are travelling to Lewes from far afield, please see our list of accommodation options for staying in Lewes.

Kinship IV Design & Make Workshop is part of Make Lewes Festival 2018

Cover Image – Railway Land, Lewes – Google Earth
Site Image – Heart of Reeds by Chris Drury. Photo – Nicholas Sinclair

Collaborative Collisions

Come and try on the fantastical felt coat of changing seasons created by Barbara Keal, Owena Lewis and many others, as part of Collaborative Collisions III.

Depot forecourt, Pinwell Rd, BN7 2JS

3-4pm Tuesday 25th to Friday 28th September

Between these times each day this week you can have this wild hooded garment lowered on to you.

And then at 6.15pm on Friday 28th, Barbara will put on the coat and parade through the town to Studio Hardie for the Makers Talks Evening.

*The coat is hanging on steel strings at the Depot but please do not touch the coat if you arrive to view it unless there is somewhere there to help you as it is fragile.


photo credit: Katie Holloway

Building with Water Symposium

Building with Water: Water, Building, Architecture, Material Sources and the Future Symposium

Saturday September 29th, 13.30 – 18.00 Fitzroy House, Lewes, BN7 2AD map

Tickets – £8.50 Concessions – £6.50

Tickets avaialble here on Eventbrite

Featuring:

Ruhul Abdin, Paraa (Dhaka-London architectural studio) & Niklaus Graber curator of the international Bengal Stream  Bangladeshi architecture exhibition. Talking about how water defines building culture across sea level Bangladesh

Richard Coutts – principal BACA Architects – leading UK specialist floating buildings studio

Clare Whistler and Charlotte Still, co-founders of Pevensey Marshes Water Week Festival and Jane Trowell from PLATFORM

Andri Snaer Magnasson –Icelandic poet and environmentalist whose Dreamland book and film activism was instrumental in stopping the massive damming of central Highlands Iceland

Maggie Black – world water and sanitation authority and author of the Global Atlas of Water

Chamchamal Healing Garden for Victims of Torture and War Trauma, Northern (Kurdistani) Iraq with Leon Radeljic from ZRS Architects/Engineers and Leif Hinrichson from the Jiyan Foundation 

Building with Water is part of Make Lewes Festival 2018 in association with Fourth Door

For more information email: info@makinglewes.org

Image credit: S AM Swiss Architecture Museum, “Bengal Stream³ 2017/18, photo: Iwan Baan

 Buildng with Water is supported by

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FutureScoping Symposium

FutureScoping – On the future of Lewes’s cultural infrastructure provision: What do we want? What does Lewes need?

Sunday September 30th, 13.30 – 17.30, Depot Cinema, Pinwell Rd, BN7 2JS map

Tickets – £6.50 Concessions – £4.50 Tickets available on the Depot website here

Lewes is changing. How does the town maintain its distinctive, individual identity, and how can cultural infrastructure, from the latest in live-work design to Maker Spaces, and alternative approaches to orthodox regeneration, be part of these changes?

Come and participate in an afternoon exploring the possible future of Lewes’s cultural infrastructure.

Featuring:

John Burrell, director BurrellFoleyFischer Architects, the architects of Lewes Depot

Alison Grant, founder and director of Fitzroy House –  Lewes’s latest cultural hub

Frances Hollis – architect and director of the WorkHome  research project, a new ‘beyond Live-Work’ approach to affordable housing

Jess Steele, director of Hastings based Jericho Road,  – at the forefront of the ‘self-renovating neighbourhoods’ community approach to urban renewal

Jennie Lathbury from Eastbourne’s Devonshire Collective Maker Space & Eastbourne Studio Ceramics

FurureScoping is part of Make Lewes Festival 2018

For more information email: info@makinglewes.org


Cover Image – Depot Cinema by BurrellFoleyFischer Architects

Event sponsers:

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MAKERS TALKS EVENING

Following on from previous festivals, our Makers talks evening again hosts locally and nationally recognised makers & crafts people.

Friday 28th 19.30 – 21.15 at Studio Hardie, Unit 4 Phoenix Works, North Street, Lewes BN7 2PE (map)

FREE (donations welcome)

Featuring:

Jim Keeling of Whichford Pottery  and the Oxford Anagama Project, who set up the well known Whichford Pottery over thirty years ago, will be talking about making and building a version of the ancient Japanese Anagama kiln, in the heart of Oxfordshire’s Whytham Woods.

Barbara Keal Lewes based felt-maker, will talk about her felt-making approach and striking resulting work.

Ceramicist Elaine Bolt, part of the MakingLewes group visiting the Bornholm international Ceramics European Ceramics Context Biennale will report back about the experience of visiting the Danish ‘potters’ island, famous for its ceramics culture.

Makers Talks is part of the Make Lewes Festival 2018 

For more information email: info@makinglewes.org


Cover image: Jim Keeling – Oxford Anagama Kiln Project. Photo: Bruce Clarke

Pop-up Pottery & Kiln firing workshop

Clay workshop for families. Part of Martin Brockman’s Sussex Claylands Tour 2018-19

September 29th, 10.00 – 17.00 at the Linklater Pavilion, Railway Land, Lewes BN7 2FG (map)

FREE EVENT (donations welcome)

Respond to the landscape, plants and animals of the Railway Land by drawing with clay pigments and making miniatures. Fire your work in a popup kiln. Follow the process of firing ceramics in the wheelbarrow touring kiln.

Martin Brockman is touring Sussex woods, downs and towns, making and firing a single pot at each stopping place. The pot is formed from clay dug from that location or nearby and fired in a wheelbarrow clamp kiln.

The series of vessels made during the tour will reference the pots made over centuries by local makers to celebrate births, deaths, weddings and harvests.

The completed series will tell a story of Sussex ceramic geography and history.

Pop-up Pottery & Kiln firing workshop is part of Make Lewes Festival 2018

For more information email: info@makinglewes.org


Photo: Katie Holloway

Collaborative Kaleidoscope 2017 – Overview

Making Lewes’s autumn 2017 series of talks turned into an impromptu mini-festival, though happening over a longer than usual six-week time frame. The title referred to Making Lewes’s range of themes encompassed by the talks. The six evening events, running from late September through to early November, were hosted in Lewes’s newest arts venue, Fitzroy House. A one-time Victorian library, by George Gilbert Scott – architect of St Pancras Station Hotel – its Neo-Gothic atmosphere is particularly powerful in the main octagonal library room where the talks were held.

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We welcomed Anne Mette Hjortshøj all the way from the Baltic Sea island, Bornholm, known across Europe as a centre for crafts and particularly, ceramics.

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Anne Mette’s warmly appealing talk, about her and the island’s pottery traditions, told with a lightness of touch easily won over the Lewes audience.  Alongside Anne Mette, Lewes’s very own Tanya Gomez  gave an equally absorbing talk about her ceramic works and the connections with the sea and traveling. Both speakers were part of the larger Making Lewes – Collaborative Kaleidoscope launch event, mixing a sit-down vegetarian supper in between talks, along with a showcase exhibition of invited Sussex potters titled Cooked, Baked and Fired Again.

 

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Our next two evenings were given over to architects, though very different types of architects. Nabeel Hamdi is internationally recognised in the development field for his work on participatory processes and community engagement in housing and other building projects in many parts of the developing world. Hamdi’s talk, titled Building a Humanitarian Architecture: Deciding Interventions, was lapped up by an audience of committed Lewesians.

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The following week Duncan Baker-Brown, Lewes’s very own high profile eco-architect and one half of BBM Sustainable Architecture, packed Fitzroy House out so that we were having to turn folks away even before the evening started. The night was in effect a book launch for his recently published The Re-Use Atlas, ML partnering with Baker-Brown. The talk profiled projects across different – if primarily European – parts of the world, which are leading the way towards realising the circular economy, through re-use, upcycling and Cradle-to-Cradle approaches to sustainability. The audience were sent home dreaming of how Lewes might also, maybe actually really,enact one or two of these inspiring examples.

 

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Following on from the Baker-Brown evening, ML temporarily rehoused itself in Studio Hardie’s workshop at the far end of the Phoenix Estate for a double bill of woody related evening talks. This again was a partnership, this time with Ditchling Arts + Crafts Museum. The two speakers were Fred Baier, one of the true originals of the furniture making and design world, and the young Polish artist, Anna Bera, who had literally just completed her art residency at the museum, the previous dat. Baier gave a characteristically one-off and unique window into his work and life, mixing comedy and gravitas and leaving the audience rolling in the ailses, and calling out for an encore. Before this Bera had talked in conversation with the British Council’s Gian Luca Amadeil. ML’s audience headed for home with a warm glow on their faces, and probably in their hearts as well.

 

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Earlier in the afternoon Bera and ML’s artist member Zuky Serper ran a very successful open Pop Up workshop in the Linklater Pavilion on the Railway Land Nature Reserve. Both artists have long worked with children, and it was particularly re-affirming to see and hear so many children with their parents, intently hammering, sawing, knocking and generally bashing away.

 

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Back in Fitzroy House, the fifth and penultimate of the talks was again all about children, though also about how children and adults can co-learn together. Emily Charkin from WIlderness Wood, talked about her and her lapsed architect partner Dan Morrish’s reason’s for taking over Wilderness Wood in Hadlow Down and turning it into an experiment in open wild learning. Charkin’s Learning through Building talk made a persuasive case for the creativity and learning whichhappens when children – and adults – work, make, and build together in the outdoor without walls world. Charkin’s children, who she invited to also talk, spoke confidently about the experience from their perspectives, making a yet more persuasive case for wild learning happening down in the woods.

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Finally, all the way from Reykjavik, Iceland, Hans Johannsson, arrived to give a mind-expanding presentation on violin-making in the 21st century. The wild northern island’s principle luthier, Johannsson has also turned his attention to a series of experiments aimed at broadening the understanding of both what violins could be in the new century – why no art nouveau violin, why no modernist violin? He asked  – and answered universal questions about the nature of sound and tone. Johannsson, a master craftsman and maker, is an inspiring illustration of just how far one can go with radical sonic ideas and technologies, while maintaining a fundamental link with the craft, if the curiosity and culture of questioning is there. It may have been the most ambitious of the talks conceptually given over the six weeks, but it left those present thought-provoked about the role, nature and possibilities of what it means to be a maker or crafts-person, if imagination and a taste for adventure are present and willing.

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